Friday, September 12, 2008

Glyph Richard





Click on picture to enlarge.

Natalie's blog can be found here, and her handwriting post, here. If you're dropping in by chance hoping to find substantive research material about showjumping, I'm sorry, but you have the wrong blog.

31 comments:

Natalie said...

Oh it's so beautifully messy! Such personality. Thanks for playing along:) I could read it just fine.

And it's so true. Writing on paper is sometime just what I need to get going on a project. Transferring it over to the computer becomes a perfect opportunity to edit as well.

My only problem is that my typing keeps up with my brain a little better.

writtenwyrdd said...

You must be in the medical professions because I cannot read one letter in three on this! Heh.

Maybe I should try this, too... Of course I drop letters all of the time when in a hurry, which doesn't help at all with the legibility!

Whirlochre said...

Hey! This is my bestest El Neato!

Kiersten said...

lol...I think there were only three or four words I couldn't get ; )

I'll have to try this. The problem being, I can't figure out how to turn the flash off on my camera...and I have no scanner. Hrm.

Kiersten said...

Alas, my handwriting too small, my camera too bad at close ups.

Oh well. You have guy handwriting, Whirl, which is good. When guys have really neat, girly handwriting, it bothers me.

Which is sexist, I know.

Whirlochre said...

I'm the same about women with allover body hair.

It shouldn't matter — but it does.

writtenwyrdd said...

Has there ever been a guy with pretty handwriting? I mean since the 1790s or so?

Whirlochre said...

Arnie.

Whirlochre said...

Saknussemm.

Kiersten said...

I know neither of them.

And yeah, WW, I've known some.

Anonymous said...

Isn't Arne Sak(?) the pov charcter of Journey to the Center of the Earth?

Most guys have non-pretty writing. Neat I'll give you, but lovely, artistic, beautiful, curvaceous? I really doubt it's common.

ww

Kiersten said...

So, Whirl, am I to take that to mean you don't often date werewolves? Or just not during key parts of the lunar cycle?

Whirlochre said...

Kiersten

Once is enough for werewolves.

Difficult not to avoid meeting the family.

What began as a romantic candlelit dinner for two ended up as a riot of slaughter for forty.

WW

Yes, 'twas he.

Robin S. said...

I swear your handwriting looks British. And I can read it. It looks a helluva lot like my husband's.

The first time I saw it, he had sent me a card and signed a loving note on it. And I couldn't read it. Since that time, I've learned to decipher hieroglyphics.

But I admit- mine is often ciphery, too. Sometimes I can't read my own handwriting a few days later - which doesn't come in very handy when I've written a note in a margin about an edit I think I need, and I can't read it to make the freaking edit.

Whirlochre said...

Some of my WIP notes are like that — legible on the whole apart from the odd few key words.

Grrr.

Mary said...

Beautifully illegible.

Handwritten blogs are the future! ;)

Kiersten said...

My writing is never indecipherable...sometimes my thoughts are, though.

Mom In Scrubs said...

I consider myself a professional messy-handwriting reader, having read doctors' handwriting for 12 years....

I can read about 60% of this.

Yikes! But as long as YOU can read it, that's what counts.

I love my handwriting. Might have to try this!

Whirlochre said...

MIS — think rollercoasters and your swirly loops will come out a treat.

writtenwyrdd said...

I used to have very lovely handwriting which hardly anyone could actually read. But it was very pretty. Carpal tunnel later and I have curly writing that is nigh illegible if I am trying to write really fast. And I might have to prove it, soonish.

How is your manuscript chugging along, anyhow, Whirlio?

Whirlochre said...

It's odd but when I was about 10, my writing was very rounded, like a series of miniature pumpkins dancing across the line. I definitely had the idea of wanting to progress along the line. Quite indistinguishable from what I write now, which is mostly for myself. Anything written for other people now tends to be done on the computer.

As for the WIP, it's been frozen for a week or so while I ponder new material, but I'm now about to get start on five chapters of editing, so I'm expecting some movement. Good news — a major plot hole turns out not to be one. Hurrah! And I've yet to udse the word prestidigitator.

Kiersten said...

Yay for the WIP! Tonight with a Scottish friend I was discussing Gilliam and Pratchett. He was complaining that my book has no wonderful descriptions such as "The ships hung in the air exactly like a brick wouldn't." To which I replied, it wouldn't really fit with the style of this book, BUT that I had a good friend whose style is wonderfully adept at absurdly delightful description, and perhaps it's a British thing.

In any case, I'm glad you're moving ahead, because you should. Because you're good, and I said so.

Whirlochre said...

A very astute observation, this, and I think you're right, Kiersten.

I do encounter more absurd wordplay in British writing and I like to think of it as a sort of aside, like a nod to the audience in a pantomime. American writing, particularly the contemporary stuff, seems to be much more immersive.

My problem with my WIP at the moment is that I've overdone some of the absurdity in places. Continuing the panto analogy, it's as if Widow Twanky has descended into the audience and taken up a seat herself.

Anyhow — here's one from the cutting room floor...

Phil said nothing and didn't even nod. Had a body language expert crashed in through the ceiling by parachute, he'd have been hard pressed to pin Phil's non-utterance down to anything other than one of 492 variations on a theme of 'fuck off while I ogle this girl's tits, you nosey parker.' He'd also have injured himself.

Seemed OK last year, but it doesn't quite work anymore...

Robin S. said...

"Nosey Parker" - I only learned what the hell that was in the late 1990s.

I think you guys are right, though, a Brit writing writes differently than an American writer writing.

And why not? We have the common language of English, but the uncommon language of 'where we come from'.

It's a bit like the difference in (purported) game shows you guys have- like the one you told me to watch on Friday night. The game of it was a minor player - the personalities and clever word craft of the participants - that's the meat of the show, in my opinion. And you as the receiver have to be on your toes if you're gonna be able to catch it as it comes. I love that.

Versus the fame shows that we have...well, to save national face, maybe I won't say they fucking suck and an audience of decently well-trained seals could understand them.

Whirlochre said...

You guys are better at ADHD sports commentary, however.

Kiersten said...

See, Whirl, I could never even begin to imagine such an odd description, but I love it.

My humor tends more toward the wry and sarcastic. I'm not good at absurd. Oddly enough, Hot Stuff is. Maybe he's secretly British.

And it's so true, Robin. While we were hanging out with our friends (she's American, he's Scottish) they had us watch an episode of Qi. Very funny--but I got the sense that I was missing a lot of the humor. It was the same with the British The Office. We loved it, but knew we were missing a lot of the humor. Which frustrates me. A lot.

Also funny was the fact that, due to the accents, we didn't realize they were using the F-word until the very last episode, when what's-his-face, Gervais? said it very clearly, and suddenly it clicked that they had, in fact, been saying it, and saying it frequently.

Kind of a funny realization for two people who don't even watch rated R movies ; )

Mom In Scrubs said...

I reread this, and got all of it...AFTER I read Natalie's blog. A little foundation information helped me immensely.

Megalomaniac...you?

Whirlochre said...

Kiersten — we've got some stonkingly good panel games going on here in the UK, and QI is one of my faves.

As for this blog, MIS — I'm glad I'm 'gettable.' There are some people out there in the blogosphere who are convinced I'm quite mad.

Kiersten said...

Wait, you AREN'T quite mad?

I'm so disappointed.

And yeah, we quite liked QI. What fun.

McKoala said...

Hm, almost legible to me. I like the drawing.

There are some people out there in the blogosphere who are convinced I'm quite mad. Surely not! Who? Tell me and I'll whip them into submission with a wet face flannel.

sylvia said...

Almost legible ... kind of.

What I really like is the way you made the face out of lines that you didn't draw!